For the time will come when they will not tolerate sound doctrine; but wanting to have their ears tickled, they will accumulate for themselves teachers in accordance with their own desires, and they will turn their ears away from the truth and will turn aside to myths. — 2 Timothy 4:3-4.

A jellyfish is a pretty and graceful object when it floats in the sea, contracting and expanding like a little, delicate, transparent umbrella. Yet the same jellyfish, when cast on the shore, is a mere helpless lump, without capacity for movement, self-defense, or self-preservation. Alas! It is a vivid type of much of the religion of this day, of which the leading principle is the widespread dislike of distinct biblical doctrine.

In the place of the Church’s once-strong views of truth, the idol of the day is a kind of Jellyfish Christianity – a Christianity without bone, or muscle, or sinew, without any distinct teaching about the atonement or the work of the Spirit, or justification, or the way of peace with God. It is a vague, foggy, misty Christianity, of which the only watchwords seem to be, “You must be liberal and kind. You must never condemn a man’s doctrinal views. You must consider everybody is right and nobody is wrong.”

We have hundreds of jellyfish clergymen, who seem not to have a single bone in their body of divinity. They have no definite opinions; they belong to no school or party; they are so afraid of “extreme views” that they have no views at all.

We have thousands of jellyfish sermons preached every year, sermons without an edge, or a point, or a corner, smooth as billiard balls, awakening no sinner, and edifying no saint.

We have legions of jellyfish young people annually turned out from our Universities, armed with a few scraps of second-hand philosophy, who think it a mark of cleverness and intellect to have no decided opinions about anything in religion, and to be utterly unable to make up their minds as to what is Christian truth. They live apparently in a state of suspense, like Mohamet’s fabled coffin, hanging between heaven and earth.

Worst of all, we have myriads of jellyfish worshippers — respectable church-going people, who have no distinct and definite views about any point in theology. They cannot discern things that differ, any more than color-blind people can distinguish colors.

They think everybody is right and nobody wrong, everything is true and nothing is false, all sermons are good and none are bad, every clergyman is sound and no clergyman is unsound. They are “tossed to and fro, like children, by every wind of doctrine”; often carried away by any new excitement and sensational movement; ever ready for new things, because they have no firm grasp on the old; and utterly unable to “render a reason of the hope that is in them.”

In short, we have a jellyfish Christianity in the land: that is, a Christianity without bone, or muscle, or power. And this creedless kind of religion, we are told, is to give us peace of conscience! And to not be satisfied with it in a sorrowful, dying world, is proof that you are very “narrow-minded.”

Satisfied, indeed! Such a weak religion might possibly do for unfallen angels. But to tell sinful, dying men and women, with the blood of our father Adam in our veins, to be satisfied with it, is an insult to common sense and a mockery of our distress.

We need something far better than this. We need the blood of Christ!

— J.C. Ryle, an excerpt from “Principles for Churchmen,” edited for ease of reading.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This